11/11 – Don’t mention the war

460 Squadron RAAF crew

I’ve just spent the 2-minute silence contemplating my late father’s involvement in the Second World War, how proud I am of him, and what he thought of the Britain in which he passed away just two weeks ago.

Dad always told me that he “fought in World War II for Europe”. He fought for peace, he was pro-Europe, and had many European friends. Heck, even our family’s ancestors came to Britain from Germany centuries ago.

On this day, please don’t use the First or Second World War as justification for Brexit, or make the wars about patriotism and national pride. While we should be glad and thankful that the Allied forces united and won those wars, those who “fought for their country” really fought for freedom and democracy for all people, mustered by the rhetoric of patriotism and national pride. They fought against fascism, signs of which we are sadly seeing increase worldwide.

The wars were awful and millions of people died, so let’s not allow wartime to be humanity’s heyday.

The dark art of WAI-ARIA

When I’m auditing sites for accessibility issues, I find that WAI-ARIA has been used in an attempt to improve the accessibility of the content. And that’s exactly why WAI-ARIA exists, but so many implementations misunderstand how the tools provided by WAI-ARIA should work together.

In my experience, it’s not that there is a lack of willingness by web developers to incorporate accessibility, but rather that there is much confusion and misunderstanding of how accessibility technically works and what is expected of them.

I’ve been meaning to write about this for a while now, and I finally have over on the Dig Inclusion blog:
WAI-ARIA: the dark art of accessibility?

A11y Rules podcast interview

The A11y Rules podcast presents a series of conversations between people involved in web accessibility and the host, Nic Steenhout.

I’ve known Nic for a long time, so it was great to chat with him about my journey to a career in accessibility, from growing up in a guest house in Devon, through a degree in Electronic Engineering, music technology, working with Drake Music, starting my own web development business, moderating Accessify Forum (now defunct) and learning from people like Steve Faulkner, Patrick Lauke, Gez Lemon, Tommy Olsson et al, through to cofounding Dig Inclusion.

I hope you enjoy listening.

A11y Rules podcast, episode 25 – Interview with Jon Gibbins, part 1

The first part of the interview, where we discuss how I got started in web accessibility and how I connect with disability, the work I currently do, how organisations can use build a culture of accessibility in their teams, and the cost of accessibility. There’s a full transcript of part 1 on the podcast website.

A11y Rules podcast, episode 26 – Interview with Jon Gibbins, part 2

The second and final part of the interview, that centres around discussing lack of awareness around accessibility, and the misunderstandings and misconceptions that arise from poor understanding of people with disabilities and the technologies they use to interact with the digital world. There’s a full transcript of part 2 on the podcast website.

Updated test: Screen readers and the iframe element

I’ve added a some new test cases to my page of accessible iframe solutions based on newer HTML5 attributes. More test results to come.

Screen readers and the iframe element in Dotjay’s Lab

Updated resource: Assistive Technology: a video tour of accessibility

I’ve fixed links to videos that have been removed from the Web and added a couple of new ones.

Assistive Technology: a video tour of accessibility in Dotjay’s Lab

Elsewhere